Disability Ramps Gets People Moving Again Outside the Home

Disability Ramps Gets People Moving Again Outside the Home

Improperly designed and constructed ramps put end users at risk and create hazardous situations. The situation can be dangerous not only for the wheelchair user, but also for the caregiver and anyone who uses ramps as a means of getting in and out of the house. Wheelchair ramp installers are certified and trained to install ramps that meet ADA guidelines. If the homeowner is going to tackle this major renovation on his own, they’d better watch the classes and follow every detail of the handicapped ramp building guides sold.

Some of the issues that a permanent wheelchair ramp installer can face are the ramp’s too steep angle, missing side rails, and even improper inclines and landings. Portable ramp installers may find that the ramp is too short, which in turn creates a steep incline for the user. Another problem faced by temporary or portable ramps is that the fastening system is not properly installed, which can lead to slipping.

It is important that the end user is safe

Wheelchair ramps must be safe, stable and slip-resistant. It is also important that any surface entering, onto or exiting the ramp that is not part of the ramp is marked with tape or fluorescent paint so that people with less stellar vision are aware of an approaching crossing.

The basic principles here are that for every inch of the ramp, you need to climb one foot up the ramp. When handling a slope, remember that the user must be able to maintain control throughout the entire ascent and descent. If a wheelchair user, walker user, cane user, or caregiver loses balance, this can be an incredibly dangerous situation.

You should also consider the length of the ramp

It is important that the ramp is of a safe length. This length is user definable, and the only thing to consider when thinking about length is the maintenance and turns required to keep the ramp length within the space allowed.

The minimum recommended ramp width is thirty-six inches. It is suitable for wheelchairs and walkers. If the ramp is to be two-way, the minimum size should be one hundred and twenty inches. Wheelchair ramps are often recommended to accommodate larger wheelchairs that are often used for patient comfort. In this case, thirty-six inches may be too narrow. Consider this before proceeding with the design and placement of the ramp.

The ramp area must be level and maintain a 48”turning radius

The rules state that there must be a sixty-inch rest break for the wheelchair user upon landing, especially if the ramp is longer than two and a half feet. With this in mind, it is recommended that you also install railings on all ramps. However, this is not the law. Only where lift heights exceed six inches with seventy-two inches of overhang are ramps required. It is important to remember that anything can happen, and even a small fall can damage an already fragile body beyond repair.

Consider the weather conditions in the area where the rampe handicapé will be located. If the area is particularly rainy or snowy, take extra steps to provide a non-slip floor for the ramps. It’s about the safety of loved ones. Before building a ramp, research it so that all safe corners can be machined to provide the safest and most aesthetic wheelchair ramp in the area.

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